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neuroscience, all the underpinnings of these skills are formed in the environments in which children, babies grow up. i spent a lot of time with a pediatrician in san francisco who is watching how to improve environments for kids but a lot of folks also take place in schools dealing with adolescence when those qualities become character. in different ways, different educator's from a chess teacher in brooklyn to a private school principal in new york city to mentors working in the highest poverty neighborhood in chicago, trying to give students the sort of support and help they need to do better in this realm. mostly we don't quite know how to teach these francs, how to help kids improve. what i write about in this book is an experiment, new innovative ideas that might be able to help kids do better in this dimension and in the process help them do better in high school and college and life. >> i am going to follow up beach author's introduction with one quick question and get to the next topic. you wrote a book a few years ago while you were reporting for the new york times on the harlem ch
know the basic military training environment is highly susceptible to the abuse of power, with established institutional safeguards to prevent misconduct by instruct druce. these safeguards are designed to dissuade misconduct very strong as sharp or selection screening and training process and to deter misconduct are an effective system of detection and accountability. leaders play a critical role because they must constantly monitor safeguards for weaknesses and make corrections as necessary. moreover, training is struck druce had a responsibility to uphold our core values and hold themselves accountable for helping to detect those who violate our standards. in a properly functioning system that minimizes misconduct, most instructors will be dissuaded from inappropriate behavior and a few who are not will be detected and held accountable for their actions. leadership will have good insight into the effect of miss that the institutional safeguards and the instruct druce will police themselves. returning now to the three questions of what happened in basic literary trainin
into industrial policy, but certainly to provide an environment which business can operate profitably with certainty, with predictability and with the flexibility it needs and then try to attract the industries of the future. that is, you know, it may sound like a pat set of prescriptions, but it's the best idea we have. i don't know, as i said, if we have the national will to implement it. and even if we did, it's a long, long, slow process. but i don't see the alternative. i don't think closing our borders is an alternative, i don't think mandating wages that are uncompetitive is a solution. i don't have a better idea. >> heidi, a better idea or do you want to endorse steve's -- >> where you started which was with the foreign direct investment and what we should be looking to do is try to attract further foreign direct investment. foreign-owned companies already provide about five million jobs in the u.s., and they tend to, your story aside, tend to be fairly high-paying jobs, relatively high-paying jobs. today tend to be more weighted towards the manufacturing sector, and so to the
to address what needs to be done in that environment. none of that is done without our dependence and involvement in the cyber war. technology drives everything we do. the internet has made is more connected than at any other time. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in private sector. let me repeat that. the vast majority of our infrastructure reside in the private sector. the national security risks and the economic risks are still with the private sector. the government does not do it alone. they do it in concert with our partners and our partners are the private sector. for those of you were talking to earlier, with the work for the government or the private sector, you can contribute no matter where you are in whatever your professional desire is. this private-sector holds a lot of data and these are pretty profound -- their protection of the priorities is he has a list of priorities. this is the top five. the cyber threat is among the most serious challenges we face as a nation, and america's prosperity will depend on cyber security. the united states does have a
, and they wanted to do business with you, partner with you, create an environment that makes it possible to invest. we know we need this. the plan, itself, is governed by a certain set of economic lodgic and rationality. here are two different interesting realities. the economic imperatives seem to be understood by the imperative, and they have a public to respond to. it's not just the egypt of mubarak where you discount the public. it seems to affect their thinking. that has implications for what the administration will do. it means that if we stand by certain principles, which, in my mind, reflect practicalities, that we have an ability to affect their behavior. what's it mean in terms of principles? well, first and foremost, republic minority rights. that's at principle for us and practicality for them. if you see large numbers of the coptic christians leaving egypt, that's not exactly a source of encouragement for people on the outside to invest. if they exclude half the population, 56% of egyptian women who are illiterate, you look at the draft constitution, and there's language in there abou
subsidizing a technology that destroys the environment in the name of saving the environment. for example, for the same -- it would take a row of 50 wind turbines from the appalachian trail to maine, that's 178 miles, to produce the same amount of electricity that four nuclear reactors would produce. the best way, mr. president, to produce cheap, clean energy in the united states is to let the marketplace do it, let the marketplace do it, not to subsidize jobs for technology that can stand on its own and produces only a small amount of unreliable electricity. so, mr. president, let's use this week to celebrate but let's celebrate the end of the temporary 21-year-old wind production tax credit and use the $12.1 billion saved to reduce the federal debt. thank you, mr. president. i yield the floor. a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from louisiana. ms. landrieu: thank you, mr. president. i have come to the floor to speak just briefly about a very exciting opportunity and occurrence that we celebrate and honor every november, and that is the opportunity to adopt chil
-intentioned authoritarian leaders because they raileesed to survive in that environment you have to succumb to that environment. you have to assimilate into that environment. so, the system in syria is very inert in that sense and was much more difficult to overcome, obviously, and perhaps he didn't have the -- where with annual and ability to take on the real forces in syria who are status quo forces and against any change that might undermine the foundation of their rule and situation. >> the situp in syria by the colonial powers was france was working with a shiite sect, which is a minority, who were to look after the sunnies, who are the majority. 10% or shias of another sect. assad belongs to this sect ands the military is from this sect and the elite are from this sect. correct? >> partial limit he would not be able to rule if it was only them in the inner circle. >> they basically in control. >> they're dominant in the military apparatus but they have also done a very good job, started under his father. of coe opting many sunnies, christians in particular and others, into the apparat
to protect all of us and create a crime free environment for americans. if the u.s. state agency see pakistani or yemen were afghan citizens they are not operating to protect or suppress the crime of those countries directing in the u.s. interest so they can't claim to be acting in the interest of the afghan herger when they see a man the bundled him off and put him nsl for days and days and days so they are more limited, they have less justification for doing what they are doing. they have more liberty of operating working with domestic citizens. >> professor skerker, waterboarding became a big issue a couple years ago in iraq and afghanistan war is waterboarding in morrill? >> i believe this. it's been used against someone who isn't being violent. further the assumption is that this fiscal discomfort like somebody speak the truth there is no correlation to and causing pain or discomfort or making somebody speak the truth is there for it is disproportionate and disconnected you are hurting somebody in the hope they reveal to you the truth and morality is any time you use christa tec
heidi, the environment clearly a global challenge, clearly a part of the foreign policy. how does it fit into the economic statecraft? >> it fits into a lot of different things the state department is working on. what we as a relatively new office of seven months and only a few people have been working on are much more than the sort of geographic priorities that the secretary has highlighted, so i probably wouldn't be the best person to speak to this department with a whole host of environmental issues. a lot more time on the year autozone and the relationship and then there's a little bit of a list from the economic analysis perspective that we tend to spend most of our time on. >> all of the subjects but maybe everybody else would like a chance to do that, too. questions? i think there is a microphone here. is there another mic? going once -- if people don't have questions i will ask them. okay. >> the council of the land that. one of the things that we observed both in the atlanta environment and looking at the global companies that has to do with our competitive edge advantage in col
because we cannot supply them with natural gas. instead of russia. in this environment subsidizing wind and solar makes no sense. refi china and india and other emerging economies would sign nine so to reduce emissions i don't take a position nine whether man-made emissions cause global warming and i it china and india to make up 37% of the population not doing so. and the first chapter the book i talk about geo engineering solutions win to think we could reduce global temperatures by just came roofs white to reflect the race. what we're doing with a 12 billion-dollar hours it is pushing people into cars they do not want to buy raising your much as a cost we are getting rid of incandescent light bulbs and disproportionately those zero least able to afford it the lowest fifth of and come distribution spend 24 percent of income on electricity natural-gas and gasoline. that's right. spending on energy and compared to an average of 7%. it it is just strange well-intentioned people who purport to represent advocates policies that will do them harm rather than a good british edition to hurric
a relatively crime free environment for americans. if u.s. state agents see, say, and pakistan the are you many or afghans citizen, they are not operating to protect or suppress crime in those countries, they're acting in u.s. interest, so they cannot claim to be acting in the interest of the afghan go her when they see him come bundled him off, and put him in a cell for days and days. so they are actually more limited. they have less justification for doing what they're doing, more levity of operating when they're working with domestic citizens. >> professor, water boarding became a big issue a couple of years ago and the worse. is water boarding immoral? >> i believe it is. it is a course of technique that , it's the type of violence that is being used against someone who's not been violent. further, the assumption is that somehow this physical discomfort will make somebody speak the truth. there is no direct correlation between causing pain or discomfort in making someone speak the truth. so therefore is disproportionate. it is disconnected. you are hurting somebody in the hope that they rev
a particular worldview and a set of assumptions and values that increasingly in a polarized environment makes it difficult for them to vote for scott brown and linda lingle and heather wilson. the problems with republicans is that they're based -- that's a very ideologically driven voters, tea party folks, but part of the republican base is more open, friendly, to voting for democrats than the democratic base is for voting for republicans, i believe. i'm sure we could chew this over. let me give you an example. but me give you an example. heidi is a terrific candidate in north olympic terrific candidate and north dakota. mitt romney won north dakota by 20, 21 points. and heidi was able to overcome that. it's true that she won them as the president one north dakota, slightly less than president, that mr. romney one north dakota slightly less than the president one massachusetts. but i think the republican coalition includes kind of a soft swing voter that is inclined to vote republican, but is more willing to vote for democrats. and, jim matheson surviving utah is amazing. amazing. john barrow
is the contributing environment that is lending itself. a lot of the police officers have to be at a certain rank and have to be kept on the contract as a source of the sort of securing full time to permanent status with protection. this is one of the conditions that actually makes it much easier on superiors and senior members of the security establishment to basically pressure them into taking questionable activities. if you don't pull the trigger then i will endure contract by the end of this year because you are in a contract you are basically not protected. i would -- you know, i would question the assumption that the securities sector reform is necessarily aimed at, you know, disempowering are dismantling the securities sector, and i would actually say that there are a lot of measures, a lot of proposals in the case of egypt that would strengthen the status of the living conditions and the working conditions of the egyptian police. >> we think that this idea of the reform versus strengthening. when we talk about strengthening, are we talking about more weapons, more capabilities that they c
in the environment or from whatever source, you're going to be, in my experience, not paying a lot of attention to things that are very far away, but how do i"n exist, how do i deal with the problem, how do my children and my family deal with these issues, and as we are welt aware, there's a lot of problems in the world. the good news is there's been a tremendous amount of progress, scientific knowledge, and many in the room have been major contributors to that, and we've made great strides. it seems to me one of the things that ought to motivate us today is to figure out how to leverage advances in science and medicine to actually benefit every person in this world that has a need that can be satisfied, solved, resolved by the advancements, and that's a task that we have in front of us, and why i'm interested in being here, why we're participating in this, and there's still a lot of work to be done. now that you're allÑi here, noby leaves the room without signing a pledge without donating your time, effort to the clause; right? you wouldn't be here otherwise. let's talk a little bit or think
. they have multiple teachers teaching classes in this epic environment. if you show examples of this then i think that's what moves the bioforward. >> host: how much would be the tuition? >> guest: the tuition or maybe, you know -- >> host: in new york, 40,000 per child. and it was built without this book and envision. a lot of markets. >> guest: know, the money is fascinated education is, someone asked me recently, have you ever spent to much in education. it's such an important thing. at the same time if you going to spend that much money if you think safely about how you are spinning. i met with some officials about this. public level charter, and private schools. regardless of schools i see how much to spend per pupil per year? if you ask a private call someone them point by thousand, 30,000, 40,000 a year. you ask you public school, you know, some stages of low as five, 6000, but most states it's 10, 15,000 in new york city public schools, 80,000. cambridge, 25,000 per year. what's your average class has? they'll usually say some number between 20 and 30. okay, private schools were cha
is sponsored by the national security committee. my name is john harrington environment private practice in new york city and in connecticut and i am the cochair of the national security committee. i would like to recognize our cosponsor an committee, the aerospace and defense industry committee and william black, my cochair for this presentation. it stretches back a full year when the national security committee proposed a program, which we tried to divine which program would have currency. we were fortunate to have leon panetta last week make a very widely broadcasted speech on the subject of cybersecurity and cyberwarfare. accordingly, the subject matter has been in news. he outlined his deep concerns about computer networks that support our military, infrastructure and business networks. mr. leon panetta elaborated on many things and that includes the high-profile attacks, including the alleged russian denial of service attack entering into georgia, the disruptions in estonia and the iranian nuclear centrifuges. there are dozens of thwarted attacks on other infrastructure occurring on an al
the environment. secondly, you talk at one point about the european parliament being an important partner for you and all the crisis related issues. white and has the fiscal pack gotten to the point that it has? when it's already clear that has two points that are conflicting with e.u. law in material and in formal terms, and that hasn't been regulated the european level. and implementation of the pact by the commission, well, how can we go along with that if the parliament is going to be excluded from that? you will have to deal with that on the first of the first. that is to come into force, but it will be impossible to implement it so how are you going to reconcile that contradiction? thank you. [speaking in native tongue] >> translator: chancellor, let me thank you very much for coming in today. i think it's been an interesting discussion. with certain heard a lot of political rhetoric. wavered not much economic reality from some members but that we are. we're used to it in this chamber. the october revolution was something to be celebrated, but chance of, i wish you well in a meeting with my
environment, and taxes is one of them. reform the tax code. when you do that, you get more revenue. guaranteed almost. i mean, it's, again, it's as i said earlier, there's opportunities here, and this is an opportunity for us as a country, and as you look at the budget analysis, joint tax committee analysis of what tax reform could be in terms of economic and growth, i mean, all of them will lead to more growth whether it's corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right, but if the president insists, said last friday, he said this was fought over in the campaign, and we fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't use the word "rates" himself, but the press secretary said the president would veto any bill that extends tax rates. if he insists rates go up for those making over $250,000, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress in the senate? >> working in two white houses, i believe a president has a veto over the press secretary, thank goodness, because i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think he was behind the curve on that,
investment and the people, to follow our country in the competitive environment, and taxes is one of them. when you do that, you will get more revenue. it's guaranteed. again, it is sort of that thing we were talking about earlier. this is an opportunity for us as a country. and if you look at the congressional budget office analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact of growth, i mean, all of them will lead to more growth, whether it is corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> he said this was fought over in the campaign and we fought over tax rates. rising tax rates. jay carney, the white house press secretary did say that the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. so he insists that tax rates go up those making over $250,000. what would your recommendation be to the republican party in the senate? >> first, i believe the resident does have a detailed view of the press secretary. i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think jay carney was maybe, i think he was a little behind the curtain. i hope.
in that environment but the voters wanted them to address the short and long-term problems with the economy which means how to raise incomes in what is the future the middle-class and put that issue on the table. with a the second term would be about. that is what this coalition is looking for but that is what those white voters are looking for. it is not tenable that your worldview is mainly focused on leaving the obligations of the commitment you made. you should recruit romney and mccain as the two last presidential candidates in the republican party and it won't be on the ballot in next time to negotiate along with the chamber of commerce to negotiate a deal on immigration reform from the beginning. if i were them i would get it out of the way and then you'll open up the economics and have a much greater challenge because on that, the voters are less sure the president knows how he is going to raise incomes and create jobs and that is i think the first thing he has to do. >> we have a comments from the audience. go ahead. >> let's not underestimate the challenge the president faces. the elect
includes a healthy environment for the children and so on. that is the state's interest in this. the church, the synagogue, mosque, they put deeper meaning in it in terms of the spiritual meaning. but we have to be very careful to separate those two discussions so that we don't further the confusion. okay. yes, sir? >> i will answer your question. >> my name is richard. i'm a christian, and i am gay. i had to do is speed read because they got your book and just now. you made no mention apparently of jonathan and david, curious if you have comment on that in the bible. and secondly, what i consider a paradox that spain recognizes gay marriage and is predominantly catholic. so i am just wondering if you have any thoughts on that, commentary for entire country that can be predominantly catholic, could be one of the first ones to go along with gay marriage. >> the reason is great. >> well, thank god. >> i know, that is where it comes from. it is an astounding thing. somehow in this country that has been dominantly run forever, they seem to have gotten this separation thing. it is really quite a
months on the ground but in three weaknesses at a time. to sort of get out of the environment, what was being reported in the united states and go back in and get the story. as that alluded, i was introduced to troops on the ground and traveling around was different, most of my time is spent traveling around with general petraeus. sitting in meetings with him and to the extent that i could. so that is the story we reported over the year. we then had these biographical sections of every chapter. what i really tried to show where the variables that were influencing petraeus' thinking. the first is general melton, who is one of the four key mentors. holly has been a wonderful source of information. the second is a gentleman who was a member of the ranger regiment. and he's helped to start joint special operations community project. before that he had been wrong in turn involved in -- not a lot of people know he has that background or interest. the third key mentor is general jack galvin. he was assigned with jack galvin several times. he not only learn military history and leadership,
in the current economic environment it may be a good policy to encourage more capital investmentment we need to discuss whether we want to have a corporate income tax and how we want to make it work. secondly, obama gave all of these tax cuts to small business. under the guise of being stimulus that the republicans wanted. taxes are antistimulus, they're savings. but the voted for these. the best indication is this. during the savings and loan crisis 20 years ago, 3,000 felony convictions, a thousand of them insiders -- the he'd savings and loans, they went to prison. how many prosecutions have we seen in the crisis that led to the meltdown in 2008? that's right. and the statute of limitations is rapidly running out, and that's absolutely incredible. neither side says, we're going to go after these people who lied, cheated and stealed, falsified documents. if you read the financial crisis inquiry commission report, which congress only gave about $10 million to monica lewinski in today's dollar is lice -- gave $10 million to, no one has been able to poke a hole in that report and when it came
an environment in which leaders in the south might think that they could orchestrate an indian massacre with his approval. and he doesn't display any great concern for justice, or even ecclesiastical sanction for many years afterwards. so i think, i think it requires a complex answer. >> next question. [inaudible] >> there we go. back up a couple months there to july 24 of 1857, supposedly when we're talking of the 10 years of isolation that brigham young was hoping that he would get, and that he did get. there are some authors and people who say that there was a given amount theatrics with rockwell and others that rode into camp up there at the campgrounds in, what was a, little cottonwood canyon where they were holding their anniversary party to indicate that the army was coming. and that brigham young already knew his army was coming and that this was more of a theatrics to rally the people pick what is your take on that? >> well, i think yet heard a lot of reports that army was on the way. but i don't think it was staged theatrics. porter rockwell and the others arrive in salt lake city, and
cares about human rights or who cares about the political environment in the foreign-policy concerns that relate to north korea. as a general rule, u.s. north korea policy follows a very similar and repetitive pattern. there are provocations by the regime missile launches, underground nuclear tests with the occasional sinkings of the south korean vote. these are followed or threats of sanctions by the international community. and then of course as with the perennial recalcitrant child, the promises that her behavior whereupon the international community comes back and provides more aid to the regime in many respects continue to prop up the regime. and of course received almost never reaches people for whom it is destined. it siphoned off by the military or sold on the black market for hard currency. this pattern raises several questions for policymakers and in the course of our discussion today, i just want to plant a few seeds that we can come back to. for particular areas that i think are worth discussing and thinking about. one is what is the effect if any of sanctions, monetary s
obama. 30% bonus for a single year. in the current economic environment it may be to encourage more capital investment. i think we need to discuss whether we want to have the corporate income tax and how we want to make it work. secondly, obama gave all the tax cuts to small business under the guide of the stimulus that the republicans wanted the tax cuts are not a stimulus, they are antistimulus but he voted for all these things and the best indication is this during the savings and loan crisis 20 years ago, 3,000 felony convictions, a thousand of them insiders. they went to prison. how many prosecutions have we seen in the crisis that led to the meltdown in 2008? that's right and the statute of limitations is rapidly running out and that's why we neither side says we are going to go off to these people but lied, cheated and steel but if you read the financial crisis commission report they gave about $10 million which is like and 80 million or 100 million-dollar, no one's been able to poke a hole in that report and when it came to washington wanted conference to? dropped it in the
to your population is, you have to manage expectations of these kinds of environments because the frustration of your population outweighs the progress, then it's difficult to be able to show that there is something that has actually been done to say that this is what we have accomplished a bad thing that is the kind of thing. >> time may not be on the side. very quickly. >> well, he talked about the problem with sequencing. we mentioned in our report. the curate catch-22 and securities sector reform is you need democracy, and you need security sector reform for democracy. how to manage this paradox to let this catch-22 is a central question. in that regard you cannot achieve everything quickly, and if you go after the most entrenched forces you will be tremendous resistance. we saw that in tunisia. at one of the things i . out that think is very much true for both countries and to some extent for libya, even though we have the absence of the state, is to push the democracy process forward. in institutional and constitutional process because you cannot move and the deeper issu
in mind the absence of of this level of manpower and as a worker contributing to the environment of lending itself to the idea that we have been seeing in egypt lately previous practices by the egyptian police, for example the fact that a lot of the police officers have to be on a certain rank and have to be kept on contract securing full time permanent employment status with protection. this is one of the conditions that actually makes it much easier on the superiors and senior members of the security establishment to basically pressure them into taking on questionable activities. if you don't pull the trigger then i went toward contract by the end of this year because you are all on a contract and you are basically not protected. so i would just question the assumption that the securities sector reform is necessarily aimed at, you know, at disempowering the security to say that there are a lot of measures and reforms in the case of egypt the with strength in the status of the conditions and the working conditions and the egyptians. >> i think that when we talk about the securit
was able to imagine myself as superhero. my socioeconomic environment come into the neighborhood bullies, demanding respect from a male peers and other pretty gross and make me feel so nervous. i later became captivated by the vasco player known for defining gravity and dunking writing his opponents face the spirit he dutifully try to imitate them as i'd seen dr. jay perform and dedicate virtually all of my free time to watching them practicing his basketball move. in other words i stop seeing in my basketball career to have what dr. jay had. nevertheless, i never forget about the falcon. it was my favorite flying black superhero. here's where we get into some cultural and ideological work. the idea of a black and white into the air, compelling tension, on an respect made a lasting impact on my imagination. the falcon also operated on the broader social level. that is the image of the falcon gliding across an urban skyline come to symbolize the unprecedented access and upward social mobility of many african-americans that were experiencing -- that african-americans experience in educatio
is has the capacity to relate to changes in environment and of course tripping happily over reputation risks. wells is a company with a culture of customer focus and restraint and the keybank provides the simple lesson, if you don't understand it, don't invest in it. each of these firms apply strong governance, good management, operational, but in sand discipline both with different approaches. some of these firms have had serious problems since the crisis and of course jpmorgan chase actually lost in their london office and an event that revealed poor risk management. the point here is, these firms have successful strategies for weathering the crisis. there is a huge difference between taking a large loss such as morgan recently took and having the company fail. the companies that failed in the crisis didn't just take losses. they went out of business and required massive amounts of taxpayer aid or ended their existence as independent companies. unsuccessful firms included man -- fannie mae and freddie mac, bear stearns, laymen, merrill lynch, citigroup, wachovia, ups, aig, countrywid
. but with the falcon i was able to imagine myself as a superhero rising above my social economic environment reading the neighborhood bullies commanding respect for my male peers and enjoying approval from all the pretty girls that made me feel so nervous. i later became captivated by the basketball player known for dunking a basketball in his opponents faces. although i dutifully try to imitate the moves i had seen dr. j. perform i dedicated virtually all my free time to watching him play and practice his basketball moves. i stops and in my basketball career and i just didn't have what dr. j. had. nevertheless i never forgot about the falcon. the falcon was my first and favorite flying black superhero. now here is where we get into cultural words. the image of a black man gliding through the air compelling attention, and respect made a lasting impact on my imagination the falcon also operated on a broader social level. that is, the image of the falcon driving across an urban skyline symbolize the unprecedented access and upward social mobility of many african-americans that were experiencing, afric
and a number of different things in the environment, and we had no idea. later, like many kids in my neighborhood, i worked at the plant myself, and, um, got a sense of what it was like to be on the nofdz the plant. there was one evening when i came home from working at rocky flats and turned on the television, and there was a show on nightline that, it was an expose of what was really happening at the plant. and it was the first time that i really had an awareness, i really had an understanding of what was happening at iraqi flats and -- rocky plattes platd how extraordinary the contamination was. it was on that day that i decided to quit my job, and that was the day i decided that i would write a book about it. it took me about ten years of research and writing to pull this story together, and i wanted to write a book that reads like a novel, but it's very heavily footnoted, and everything in the book is factual. but i wanted to write this story from the perspective of all of the different kinds of people whose lives had been affected by rocky flats. not just residents like me and
learning environment. the best thing to do is turn off the tv and disconnect the x box and get outside. we talked about field trips. i really believe that. is so boring to go to these old historic houses. one more comment along those lines, so many museums historic houses, presidential sites and then listened to a great many of them in the book about the american president have come so far from where they were ten years ago the lone 50 years ago, much more interactive, have more bells and whistles, much more family friendly. they're not your grandfather's museums. you can't go to my the leader or mount vernon or monticello and not get the sense that they are trying to expand the story they are telling and involve families and kids. that is why i think that is a wonderful part of a learning experience and when you do it together it makes it more fun. fun is a good thing and learning is not meant to be a four letter word. fun is not a four letter word. >> host: if you would like to contact kenneth davis on social media here is the addresses including our twitter handle@booktv. if you like a
sorts of things. but also along with training them, you have to create an institution and environment were you see guys going to happen and it's not necessarily a career ender when it happened. but we are working on it and i think we've gotten better because it's absolutely essential that we do. briefly in the demographics, one of the things i noticed was about 70% are public diplomacy dollars were spent if you do it demographically on an over the age we flipped out because looking at the world and the way it is, the fact of the matter is you have a far better opportunity employment being a planting seeds of the younger demographic, paul said it is difficult when someone reaches 40, 50, 62 change their perception of their ideas. when they are younger you have an ability to do it. if we can have a good conversation with a young girl in pakistan, 15 or 16 years old, she will be able to change the perception of the united states and her family and her community and away we never could. so it's a wise estimate, not just for the future, but frankly for right now. >> so with a clash of tech
countries that have more competitive environment and taxes are one of them. yes, we have to reform the tax code. when you do that, i will get more revenue. it is guaranteed. again, sort of as i was talking about earlier. this is opportunities here. this is opportunity for us as a country. if you look at the congressional budget analysis and joint tax committee analysis, what tax reform could mean in terms of macroeconomic impact and growth, all will lead to more growth, whether corporate tax reform or individual tax reform. >> right but if the president insists as he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and, fought over tax rates, rising tax rates, he didn't ice the words rates himself but jay carney, the white house press secretary said the president will veto any bill that extends the current tax rates. if he insists that tax rates go up for those making over $250,000, what's, what would your recommendation be to the republican congress and senate? >> first having worked in two white houses i believe a president does have a veto over the press secretary. thank goodness b
examines how the u.s. can be economically competitive in a global environment. >> later today british prime minister david cameron delivers his keynote address on policy at the lord mayor's banquet in london. the event is attended by members of the city's financial and diplomatic corps. you can see his remarks live at 3:30 p.m. eastern over on c-span. >> 2013 should be the year we begin to solve our debt through tax reform and entitlement reform. and i'm proposing that we avert the fiscal cliff together in a manner that insures that 2013 is finally the year that our government comes to grips with the major problems that are facing us. >> i'm open to compromise. i'm open to new ideas. i'm committed to solving our fiscal challenges. but i refuse to accept any approach that isn't balanced. i am not going to ask students and seniors and middle class families to pay down the entire deficit while people like me, making over $250,000, aren't asked to pay a dime more in taxes. >> the newly-elected congress starts work in january, but the current congress still has work to do through the end of the
investment is going to follow countries that have a more competitive environment in taxes is one of them's a we have to reform the tax code and when you do that you will get more revenue. it's guaranteed. again, as i was talking at earlier there are opportunities here for us as a country and if you look at the congressional budget analysts this and go to the tax committee analysis what tax reform could mean in the economic growth and all of them will lead to more growth with this corporate tax reform. estimate of the president says what he did last friday, this was fought over in the campaign and we fought over rising tax rates. jay carney said they would veto any bill that extends the current tax rate so if he insists that tax rates go out for those making over to under $50,000 will would your recommendation before the conference in the senate? >> working in to white house is i believe a president does have a veto because i like the president's comments better than jay carney's comments. i think jay carney mabey was a little behind the curve on that because look, it makes no sense to ta
. >> jim put out serious policy issue on the table. this is a partisan, you know, environment that we're in. we're inside the u.s. capital here, step from the capitol here inside the committee room. there's not much that happened in washington today because of the bart disan fighting. it there there room after of the agenda we spend $6 billion in a campaign beating each other's brains out and came up with the same president, congress, and senate four serious bipartisan efforts on curing diseases like alzheimer's or any other short of agenda. we start somebody from a partisan perspective. , ralph. [laughter] >> well, let me put it on the wish list. part of this i'm sure the partisan comment. the i looked at ralph's reaction to this, he said if we look at what the pattern of the vote in 2010 election that is replicated to stwowrt, then we will then, you know, we can have a big push back against the democrats. okay. the now that is a formula, that's what happened in 2010. 2010 set up 2012. that is the extremism of the polarization that set up the 2012 election. we have a situation where republ
discussions would lead to a more stable likelihood of a more stable environment and i would put that forward as a way of engaging other countries and hopefully by closing the gap which i believe has happened over the last several years between the military industry to historically working for the military for the common good for the country in which we are operating and this will lead to more stability in a larger sense as a part of society along with the rule of law and stable economy and thriving business, eight parts society. >> i have an answer that is quite controversial that doesn't have to do with the military perce but has to do with the policy on how much u.s. controlled the development of medical devices and drugs and it has become so problematic that big pharma and medical technology developers are now going to other countries to do clinical trials and the work that is necessary to prove there are drugs and devices that work successfully in humans. this is a very backward way of promoting national security in the context of preventing people from disease and injury through advance
. and talking about the public. that is not an environment in which she wheeled to say, let's go put a plan of a table. he put a plan to the table in both size and rejected. i will pause now. i actually do. >> we are already way over time. that would give one last quick question. >> thank you very much. i am with the law's vagueness council. my question is, if the demonstration decides that military action is only the -- the only exercisable options, have the other allies signaled or committed that there would support israel and the u.s.? if so, who and what type of support can we expect? >> well, i don't think there have been those kinds of discussions because the focus is ben on diplomacy on everybody's part. by the way, it's an israeli concept. the israelis believe you can still achieve this through non-military means. one of the reasons i oftentimes did ask the question, wireless so vocal about this? if you look at what they did, the syrian one. you never heard word one about that. there's three reasons. it was designed to motivate the rest of the world. i think, by the way, we know fro
's not an environment in which you can say, gee, put a plan on the table and have it be sented. put a plan on the table, both sides reject it. if you put a plan on the table, the idea it's only table, it might be something that could work in a certain moment, but if they are rejected, it's hard then to somehow recreate it so i will pause now. i actually do have a 14-point proposal which will shock you. [laughter] i actually do. >> we are already -- >> i'm willing to leave it. >> you were patient. wuch last quick question and quick answer. >> thank you very much. i'm with the las vegas council. if the administration decides that military action is our only exercisable option, have other allies signaled or committed they would support israel and the u.s.? if so, who, and what type of support can we expect? >> well, i don't think there's been those kinds of discussions because the focus has been on diplomacy on everybody's part. the concept of crippling sanctions is an israeli concept telling you the first instance the israelis believe you can achieve this in notary public--- non-military means. i'm asked
the environment for investment. .. that is vanishing. i know people who believe it is very important energy and should not be and it is not, in this case, a political issue. in europe and in america, they're going to make this outlandish opacity. you know, the opaque nature of these deals is corruption. when you publish what you pay, then the civil societies in those regions get to hold their governments to account. that is one the best things you can do to stimulate business and investments. thank you. [applause] >> hello, this issue is really close to my heart. how do we develop a global citizen's perspective and incentivize people to prioritize life outside of the u.s.? >> this sounds good. >> there is an amazing website. they just put on a concert in central park and they played. we have neil young, the black keys, a lot of people think, what? they are really pushing this idea. it is a jump in human consciousness. and i think that going to that website, i recommend it. >> good evening, i am vivien. i want to thank you for speaking candidly about africa. i am excited to sure about my con
into these environments which are very, very important places to be, and debate our core value, not just explained them, not just lecture, but actually debate our greatest strengths i think will be stronger. so that was one of the ways we really tried to do that. and also to take the benefit of the folks who were there in the field, give information as to who was the important audiences for the bbg. >> can i just clarify one thing? when i said more guidance from foreign policy leadership for the bbg, i certainly didn't mean that the bbg should forsake or distort or anyway jeopardize the journalistic values. very, very important. but for example, the bbg's, the board of governors decide where the assets are allocated. in other words, if the governors decide we're going to put all the money into india, it's their decision rather than the part of the more strategic decision-making process. congress would get involved if all the money went to one country. >> do you think? [laughter] >> there's certain country's bbg would like to get rid of that congress wouldn't allow and that sort of thing. but i'm guessi
's different about this environment is fax the tax rates, the bush tax rates to expire for everybody. after this campaign would be pretty shocking as any candidate ever. i am going to raise taxes, and unless he suddenly decides i didn't mean it it doesn't really matter all that much what the speaker thinks is acceptable because on this one issue that tax cuts will expire. all house republicans a sign grover norquist not to raise tax rates. the entire bush tax cut expires the end of the year you extend it for 97% of americans he's never actually voted to raise taxes. you're only cutting taxes. so it's possible when the speaker said that yesterday i was thinking it wasn't really reflecting the world that he now lives and so unless the president is willing, they will not be. >> i have a question for you. to what extent will there be a major -- it was in the republican party against the tea party. >> i'm sorry? >> to what extent will there be an overt republican movement against the tea party? >> i don't know that there would be a strong overt movement against them in large part the sort of fea
a very weak economy. and we are looking at, as you said, an environment in which people are really in panic mode over the fiscal cliff. and i think there is a lot of support actually because the population doesn't seem to understand what exactly the fiscal cliff is and what it means and what they're hearing on television is an awful lot of hype about what's going to happen come if the fiscal cliff isn't a boy. and i think what that is doing is it's generating quite a bit of support for both sides to come together. it seems like the right thing to do, put your partisan differences aside and do what's best for the country. and figure out someway to avoid the cliff. and what that means in practice is striking some kind of a deal. what we are probably all heard referred to as a grand bargain. and i think what is important to keep in mind is that the grand bargain itself is really a form of austerity. it's an austerity plan. and so when you got an economy that is still struggling to fully find its feet, and you're at the same time talking about imposing austerity, i think we've seen pre
. >> so jim has just put a serious policy issue on the table. this is a partisan, you know, environment that we're in. we're inside the u.s. capitol here, or steps from the capitol inside a committee room. there's not much that happens in the washington today because of the partisan fighting. um, is there room after this agenda where we just spent $6 billion in a campaign beating each other's brains out and came up with the same president, the same congress and the same senate for serious, bipartisan efforts on curing diseases like alzheimer's or any other short of agenda? ralph or stan, we start with somebody from a partisan perspective. >> well, let me put the this on my wish list. i'm sure this seems like it's going to be a partisan comment. the -- i looked at ralph's reaction to this, um, where he said that if we look at what the pattern of who votes in the 2010 election, if that is replicated in 2014, um, then we will, then we can have a big pushback against the democrats, okay? the -- now, that's a formula, because that's what happened in 2010. 2010 set up 2012. that is, the extre
states military are fighting on our behalf day in and day out so we can live in a safe environment here at home. our service members are well aware of the risks that they face as they serve this nation. and it is our duty to do all that we can to honor those who fight and pay the ultimate price for our freedoms. today i'm here to pay my respects to sergeant jason m. swindoll, an arrest kansas who at 24 years -- an arkansan who was 24 years of age. he attended high school in cabot, arkansas, assigned to b company, first battalion, 64th regiment, third infantry division in fort stewart, georgia. he was serving his third combat deployment. he was' thaoupl mustily awarded -- he was awarded the bronze star and purple heart. his family and friends describe him as being a fun-loving guy who was very patriotic and very proud of the work he was doing in the army. in addition to being a soldier, sergeant swindoll was also a husband and father. he lives behind his wife chelsea, who is expecting their second child, and a one-year-old son, paxton. mr. president, it is people like jason swindoll who
of the committee of which i'm a member, environment and public works, and we observed that the proposal was to give bureaucrats, government officials, unelected, the power to meet with special interests or whoever they chose to meet with or not meet with and set the amount of fees, taxes perhaps you might call it, that would be required of americans before they could hunt ducks. that's never been so. previously the congress set how much you could charge for a duck stamp. and so this was raised in committee and our able chairman, chairwoman, senator barbara boxer, agreed and i guess by a voice vote it was accepted that there will be a limit on how much -- that the congress would set the limit on how much you could raise a duck stamp. and burden duck hunters with. and that's an important principle, in my opinion. that's violated by the bill that was brought up. not the one that passed committee, but the one brought up by the leader. so i have got to say, you know, i grew up in the country. i hunted. i don't hunt anymore. i go back home and love to be in the woods, but i just don't hunt anymore. but i
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